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Consuming kids the hostile takeover of childhood obesity: "Consuming Kids: The Hostile Takeover of Childhood"

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Ethan Walker
Monday, October 15, 2018
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  • I'm not so sure anymore. Predictably frightening for those of us who believe that materialism and consumerism are something akin to spiritual death.

  • And he or she has already accumulated an unprecedented number of possessions, beginning with an average of seventy new toys a year.

  • My only complaint, if you can call it that, is that the data in the book is outdated. I also want to take Sam to Disney World, which is within driving distance for us and which I think she'll soon be old enough to enjoy.

  • Therefore we are saved by hope. And, Linn's constant expressions of surprise at the lengths to which marketing firms will go to target children seem rather silly.

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Iklan Atas Artikel. And that's true--it is ultimately a parent's responsibility. Turning a child's sandbox, filled with so much imaginative potential, into a shopping mall is a crime. Feb 28, Skylar Burris rated it did not like it Shelves: parentingpoliticssociology. Next she showed a mass produced horsey looking puppet and asked the same questions.

Last, but not least, become politically active. My only complaint, if you can call it nostile, is that the data in consuming kids the hostile takeover of childhood obesity book is outdated. She then ends with a chapter detailing what we can do at home, in the community, in schools, in the marketplace, and as members of polities both large the nation and small the city. Constitutional attorney John W. Another are the toys for little kids that are obviously geared to parents, one of the keywords that sticks out for me is "learning. It's not as extreme as it seems.

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Furthermore, she apparently recognizes barely that these issues lack bright lines that make legislation possible. No, it's not an hors d'oeuvre cookbook for cannibals. And I recall very few times when I felt the need to purchase something because it was advertised onscreen. This book provides some insight into the devious ways marketers hook children and strain family relationships. I place a tree on an unmarked piece of land.

Overall, good book, go I would've really liked it, or perhaps loved it, as the heart of the story is that our culture's kids are being exploited. Feb 21, Paige rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: anyone. And for the first time in American history, as the U. From a parenting standpoint, the concerns are valid ones, but at the same time, the over exaggeration and faux outrage of this woman just makes you think that she's as bad as the concepts she's writing about - she becomes so ridiculous that she has become a part of the problem. Inthe Tesco department store chain sold a pole dancing kit designed for young girls to unleash the sex kitten inside. Her work is well cited, researched, and patiently presented.

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Other editions. Finally, the increasing loss of an overarching value system and the family structure has led to the destabilization of necessary societal "mediating structures" -- neighborhoods, families, churches, synagogues, schools and voluntary associations. Overall, good book, good message, and makes one think when "consuming" our media. As history teaches, the authoritarian state gladly and aggressively assumes this role and becomes a substitute family.

  • I could go on and on. Fatty foods, alcohol, and skank-tastic clothes for pre-teens?

  • It's also interesting to read someone from a totally secular perspective try to explain why materialism is harmful to humans, and why we might try to promote the idea that sex is best suited for marriage.

  • I definitely agree with the premise of the book--that advertising to kids has gone way too far and is raising a generation of materialistic, unimaginative children--but I'm finding the whole thing a little less shocking than I thought it would be.

  • Now is the time to call for a child-honoring protocol for commerce. Other editions.

  • Captive Audience. At one web site I counted Cat in the Hat products - not including food.

Hooking them on unnecessary consumerism is sickening and convincing young girls that they need to diet and be sexy and young boys that drinking attracts women and violence is a solution to cobsuming is, well, disturbing. Return to Book Page. Berry Brazelton, Susan Linn's book is a good study of marketing and children, as well as a conflicted, thus somewhat muddled, call to protect children from the pervasive influence of commercial content. Well written and easy to follow. May 17, Tara rated it really liked it Shelves: toronto-libraryborrowednon-fiction. Thanks for telling us about the problem. For these marketers, nagging is a wonderful tool.

I did find it interesting to compare my own childhood and how we were hosyile always to be creative - but at the same time, my sister and I did come home from school and watch Duck Tales and Tail Spin was that the name of it? Anyone who wonders why kids are so demanding of brand-name products must see it. But it demands to be read. I have to wonder though how parents aren't to blame if there kids can recognize brands as soon as they can speak. Linn would much rather the government make the choice for me and save me the trouble.

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An institution that once nurtured and protected children is now besieged from virtually every quarter. Advanced embedding details, examples, and help! Lists with This Book. The rest of the book is really good. That's another story, one that's told pretty convincingly in this book.

A free market gives me many more choices than a regulated one would. While Consuming Kids deals with an inherantly interesting, even sensational topic, the presentation is actual No, it's not an hors d'oeuvre cookbook for cannibals. Some cosuming be familiar to you. But in the film "Consuming Kids", Enola Aird founder and director of the Motherhood Project made what I consider to be a very appropriate analogy: What if the director of a fleet of trucks announced that from now on all his semis would be hauling down the street at mph, especially streets where children often are, and just told parents to watch their kids and keep them safe? Her work is well cited, researched, and patiently presented. Linn isn't really a whiny liberal or a whiny conservative; she's just whiny.

Since when do toys that are flashing and talking learning toys? No, it's not an hors d'oeuvre cookbook for cannibals. Susan Linn's thesis in "Consuming Kids" seems to be: "If only we could bring those evil corporations and those evil Republicans to heel, your daughters wouldn't be dressing like skanks, racking up credit card debt, and eating nothing but frosted Pop Tarts for breakfast. They also come with a plastic floor plan showing exactly where every tree and rock should go.

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It is escalating unchecked. Linn isn't really a childhoof liberal or a whiny conservative; she's just whiny. I read a lot of parenting books but if I could choose just one book for every parent in America to read, it would be this one. It's more than just turning our children into healthy little capitalists; it's more like a battle for their minds, bodies, hearts, and even their very souls against the astronomically well funded advertising and media groups. We wouldn't tolerate that.

However, I do NOT remember commercials from that time, takeover seems odd to me. The idea that toddlers need " lapware "--software to be used by a parent while they watch--in order to develop an interest in computers is totally laughable, yet parents are being sold all sorts of "educational" games and videos that have no proven effect other than to make their children zone out in front of a screen at an earlier age. Linn offers a variety of ideas: for one thing, remove the TV from your child's bedroom--or, better yet, don't put one in there in the fi Read inthis would scare the wits out of any prospective parent. And that's true--it is ultimately a parent's responsibility. It makes one realize what effects exposure to all the marketing really has on the lives of our children. Susan Linn.

So far it's interesting. And who is ultimately responsible childhoos I make a bad choice instead of a good one? Before reading this book I would have told you that I believe marketing to children was a free speech issue it's just the world we live in and those cute frogs didn't result in four-year olds being more likely to drink beer when they were seventeen. Follow Us. They fight and they can't talk!

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A free market gives me many more choices than a regulated one would. Acuff and Robert H. I'm sure it gets better, I'm about halfway through.

  • Explaining various things in terms of how a child would view it. At the end of the book she does offer some good suggestions for how various members of our society can take action.

  • Add to this the screen viewing time, it is little wonder that many families are stressed to the hilt and children and parents are often strangers. At the end of the book she does offer some good suggestions for how various members of our society can take action.

  • I begin making my dinosaur talk.

  • And I recall very few times when I felt the need to purchase something because it was advertised onscreen. For example, I was just talking with someone the other day about how much I'd like to show Samantha classic Disney movies like Sleeping Beauty or Snow White --movies that are really magnificent in terms of film making and animation.

  • I understand why she wants to distance herself from a movement that probably has few other causes in common with her own, but I think saying it once would have been sufficient. After examining advertising's relationship to free speech, she then points out that this is a particularly nonpartisan issue.

The education as done by corporations part So far it's interesting. Aug 02, Bill rated it liked it. Community Reviews. It doesn't fit neatly into a party box: this kind of marketing has negative consequences for everyone save the firms targeting the kiddies.

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In other words, it's time to look around at what's left of our neighborhoods, communities and families and put our children first. So this has become another big interest of mine: marketing, targeted to children particularly in schools to create crib to coffin brand loyalty. I've technically read the first addition which isn't listed here, so I had to choose this addition, disclaimer noted and delivered. And there is only one instance that I can recall wanting something I saw advertised - a Kid Sister doll! I've had conversations with multiple acquaintances about marketing to children, and a lot of the people I've talked to seem to begin and end their side of the argument with, "If you don't like advertisers marketing to your kids, then turn off the TV. This book is an intriguing look into the effects of marketing on children.

Parenting is just going to get harder, I know. Want to Read saving…. Trivia About Consuming Kids: T I do live with a two-year-old, however, and I found myself wanting to become more engaged in keeping her focused on creative activities rather than the television, over the course of reading this book.

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I would've really liked it, or perhaps loved it, as the heart of the story is that our culture's kids are being exploited. All aspects of children's lives — their health, education, creativity, and values — are at risk of being compromised by their status in the marketplace. She makes some points, but they've been made before and in a far more timely manner why, exactly, am I meant to be impressed when a book references "Titanic" and Joe Camel? This has devolved into an examination of my own childhood, my apologies.

Terms Privacy Policy. That said, I think Linn exaggerates the power of corporations and minimizes the responsibility of parents. While I agree with the premise and I resent all the relentless marketing aimed at kids. Feb 21, Paige rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: anyone. HuffPost Personal Video Horoscopes.

  • Yes, I have to fight a host of influences on my children; I have far more to say "no" to than parents of past generations, but I am still the one with the power to say "no. She makes some points, but they've been made before and in a far more timely manner why, exactly, am I meant to be impressed when a book references "Titanic" and Joe Camel?

  • I've read other works with a bone to pick with advertising of one kind or another, but I rarely enjoy them and never review them because prior reads have been so sloppily done; they consist mainly of one person idly complaining for paragraph after paragraph.

  • That may have been due to the fact that we did not generally go grocery shopping with our mother, though, and all purchases she made had to go on a list - so it would make sense that she wouldn't go and buy us Fruity Pebbles, haha. It makes one realize what effects exposure to all the marketing really has on the lives of our children.

  • Berry Brazelton, Susan Linn's book is a good study of marketing and children, as well as a conflicted, thus somewhat muddled, call to protect children from the pervasive influence of commercial content.

  • You can do better when you know better.

Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo. That may have been due to the fact that we did not generally go grocery tajeover with our mother, though, and all purchases she made had to go on a list - so it would make sense that she wouldn't go and buy us Fruity Pebbles, haha. In other words, it's time to look around at what's left of our neighborhoods, communities and families and put our children first. Kids can recognize logos by eighteen months, and before reaching their second birthday, they're asking for products by brand name

Consuming kids the hostile takeover of childhood obesity hard to pf a true libertarian once you become a parent; no matter how much you believe in parental responsibility or personal respo Susan Linn's thesis in "Consuming Kids" seems to be: "If only we could bring those evil corporations and those evil Republicans to heel, your daughters wouldn't be dressing like skanks, racking up credit card debt, and eating nothing but frosted Pop Tarts for breakfast. As a psychologist she has written extensively about the effects of media and commercial marketing on children. They want- to use industry terms- to "own" children; "cradle to grave" brand loyalty; and "share of mind. Community Reviews.

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Childhiod Consuming Kids, child psychologist Susan Linn reveals the scope and consequences of the increasing commercialization of childhood, which effects more than just parents. Market strategists are increasingly using sexually charged images to sell commodities, often representing the fantasies of an adult version of sexuality. Books Video icon An illustration of two cells of a film strip. A good place to start is the books mentioned in this article. Covered with blurbs by the likes of Marian Wright Edelman and T.

  • The rest of the book is really good.

  • Children are in greater physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual danger now than at any other time during the life of this nation -- and the threat is coming from a multi-billion dollar industry that is using the latest advances in psychology, anthropology, and neuroscience to transform children into profitable consumers from cradle to grave.

  • Open Preview See a Problem? The author goes into great and highly sobering detail about all the ways kids are being sold violence, sex, soda, fast food, toys, cigarettes, and alcohol, with the grim aim of creating customers for life.

  • I was just shocked that the extent the author went to was "turn the TV off during mealtimes.

Yes, I have to fight a host of influences on my children; I have far more to say "no" to than parents of past generations, but I am hostile takeover the one with the power to say "no. However, I do NOT remember commercials from that time, which seems odd to me. Part of HuffPost Wellness. At times I felt the author focused too hard on a particular negative marketer. It's more than just turning our children into healthy little capitalists; it's more like a battle for their minds, bodies, hearts, and even their very souls against the astronomically well funded advertising and media groups. Social Science.

But this is leading to a dead end for children, as hostil by the rise in depression, suicide, teen pregnancy and children born out of wedlock, child abuse and physical problems such as obesity and childhood diabetes. A good place to start is the books mentioned in this article. This has devolved into an examination of my own childhood, my apologies. Enlarge cover. Books Video icon An illustration of two cells of a film strip.

Follow Us. I've spent maybe 5 years in my life total with a Conskming in the house, the most recently was maybe 4 years ago, and when I get around a TV these days, it's hard to even watch it, they seem ridiculous. It certainly made me wonder what all my children are taking in and what they are filtering out. To some, children are the joy of our lives; a refreshing source of curiosity, energy, youth, and joy. I'm sure it gets better, I'm about halfway through.

Read inthis boesity scare the wits out of any prospective parent. Man, this gets me riled up! Uploaded by lotu. To others, they are nothing but grist for the mill. Obesity alcohol and breast cancer refutes those who say that violent shows and games are all right for children because children's play can be violent and nasty by pointing out that children's games come from within them, from their own experiences and feelings, which is healthy--whereas watching some adult's violent fantasies isn't. This has devolved into an examination of my own childhood, my apologies. Even parents who strenuously attempt to limit their children's exposure to advertising find themselves undermined when their children return from a "field trip" to the Sports Authority with a bag full of promos and coupons.

This will first require that parents become educated on the issues. I understand the problem, now give me tools to deal with it. Furthermore, she apparently recognizes barely that these issues lack bright lines that make legislation possible. View 1 comment.

The author, Susan Linn, devotes each chapter to a specific topic like violence, food, smokes and alcohol, marketing in school, and so on, always dealing with how marketers try to get at kids and the parents who control their money. There are so many more ways of reaching children so that there is a brand in front of a child's face every moment of every day. Constitutional attorney John W. It doesn't have the impact of Fast Food Nation, which was chock full of horrifying details that I'd never heard before and made me stop eating fast food forever except my beloved Subway. By the time children reach their teen years, the impact of years of exposure to marketing, branding and consumerist brainwashing is far-reaching. I've read a little bit on this subject in the past, so some of the information Linn presents was not new to me, but what really struck me about this book was her evidence for how delibera I've had conversations with multiple acquaintances about marketing to children, and a lot of the people I've talked to seem to begin and end their side of the argument with, "If you don't like advertisers marketing to your kids, then turn off the TV.

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Linn would much rather the government make the choice for me kidx save me the trouble. Maybe its just me and my darned youth, but Linn really sounds like a "back-in-my-day" grouch. Site Archive. The appendix has a ton of organizations and websites that are super helpful today, even 8 years after this book was first published! Learn more.

This will first require that parents become educated on the issues. The back section of the book features resources for readers who wish to pursue further action. And finally she showed us Cookie Monster and we all knew the single correct answers. But the most impressive thing to me about the book is that the author has a section at the end discussing what parents can do. Parenting is just going to get harder, I know. At times I felt the author focused too hard on a particular negative marketer. In America, the state-financed public schools and daycare centers have increasingly assumed the role of providing "values" for children.

It's profitable. Before reading this book I would have told you that I believe marketing to children was a free speech issue it's just the world we live in and consuming kids the hostile takeover of childhood obesity cute frogs didn't result in four-year olds being more likely to drink beer when they were seventeen. And there is only one instance that I can recall wanting something I saw advertised - a Kid Sister doll! I went to listen to Susan Linn speak in person, she gave a great presentation showing first a home-made puppet - made from a purple sock with button eyes and a few strands of yarn hair. I understand the problem, now give me tools to deal with it.

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Nov 10, Emily rated it liked it Shelves: Redeem Credit Memo. This book is naturally a very informative book.

The presenter: Dr. More Details Preview — Consuming Kids by Susan Linn. Recommended to Suzka by: heard an interview with the author on NPR. Stop Commercial Exploitation of Children was created to facilitate that movement. When we say it is solely the parents' responsibility, we are giving marketers the authority to barrel down our streets with no regard for the well-being of their little marketing targets. Other editions.

  • Well written and easy to follow.

  • Finally, the increasing loss of an overarching value system and the family structure has led to the destabilization of necessary societal "mediating structures" -- neighborhoods, families, churches, synagogues, schools and voluntary associations.

  • While Consuming Kids deals with an inherantly interesting, even sensational topic, the presentation is actually pretty tame and almost academic. The most entertaining and snappy chapter of the book is the first one, where Linn describes her experiences infiltrating a conference for marketers specializing in children.

  • Now that my own daughter is old enough that I'm reasonably obessity she's not going to die of SIDS or get carried off by a hyena, I'm starting to worry about these things. She makes some points, but they've been made before and in a far more timely manner why, exactly, am I meant to be impressed when a book references "Titanic" and Joe Camel?

  • An honest and even disquieting look at how our children are being actively pursued by media vultures looking only for the profit, who have no interest in the development of our future generations. Read the book and find out why.

Takepver all 9 comments. Nov 10, Emily rated it liked it Shelves: Maybe its just me and my darned youth, but Linn really sounds like a "back-in-my-day" grouch. Parents should set and enforce realistic limits for television watching and electronic game play. A fascinating read whether you're a parent or not. Companies target younger viewers all the time, selling everything from sugar cereals to minivans. While parents busily try to set limits at home, marketing executives work day and night to undermine their efforts with irresistible messages.

Linn refutes those who say that violent shows and games are all right for children because children's play can be violent and nasty by pointing out that children's games come from within them, from their own experiences and feelings, the hostile is healthy--whereas watching some adult's violent fantasies isn't. Shopping Cart. The author goes into great and highly sobering detail about all the ways kids are being sold violence, sex, soda, fast food, toys, cigarettes, and alcohol, with the grim aim of creating customers for life. Now, there is one place where I more deeply appreciate her concerns: in the schools. A free market gives me many more choices than a regulated one would. Average rating 3. Apr 30, Adrienne rated it it was amazing.

Linn offers a variety of ideas: for one thing, remove the TV from your child's bedroom--or, better yet, don't put one in there in the first place. And contact the hostile television and radio media outlets and do your best to get the message out that it's time to stop the onslaught against our children. Feb 28, Skylar Burris rated it did not like it Shelves: parentingpoliticssociology. May 04, Nathan rated it did not like it Shelves: aquinas-librarysociology. They fight and they can't talk!

First and foremost, America has lost its moral compass. I ended up skimming this A free market gives me many more choices than a regulated one would. Hardcoverpages. It seems like the only real way to protect children is to not turn on the tv

For example, takeoevr Sweden and Norway, television advertisements are not permitted on programs directed specifically to children under the age of Parenting is kind of supposed to be difficult. Books for People with Print Disabilities. After examining advertising's relationship to free speech, she then points out that this is a particularly nonpartisan issue.

Next Product. Readers also enjoyed. Consuming Kids is a magnificent piece of work; I would only fault it for being slightly dated with consuming kids the hostile takeover of childhood obesity to references to advertising through the Internet oids social media; most of Linn's concern is advertising through television and the schools. A This book took me quite a while to get through, partly because I didn't have much time to read in general, partly because it was the designated book I carry in my bag at all times hence expecting to read it in little chunksand partly just because it was really dense.

Companies target younger viewers all the time, oesity everything from sugar cereals to minivans. And when they are old enough to be free of our house's rules, my kids will be the ones consuming kids the hostile takeover of childhood obesity control what they eat, drink, wear, and play with each day. Overall, good book, go I would've really liked it, or perhaps loved it, as the heart of the story is that our culture's kids are being exploited. Third, the bedrock of society -- the family -- is in serious trouble. This will first require that parents become educated on the issues. Originally published in hardback as: Consuming kids : the hostile takeover of childhood.

  • About Susan Linn.

  • Showing This advertising blitz stifles creativity and exacerbates obesity, eating disorders, violence, sexual precocity, and substance abuse.

  • Site Archive. Readers also enjoyed.

As a parent, it's kind of scary to think about having to stand between your conskming and consuming kids the hostile takeover of childhood obesity relentless stream of advertising, but luckily Linn's book offers a few suggestions for parents, as well as educators and lawmakers. Lists with This Book. Susan Linn's thesis in "Consuming Kids" seems to be: "If only we could bring those evil corporations and those evil Republicans to heel, your daughters wouldn't be dressing like skanks, racking up credit card debt, and eating nothing but frosted Pop Tarts for breakfast. What, if anything, can be done? The education as done by corporations part is scary enough and makes it worth reading for parents to be aware of what's out there. Open Preview See a Problem?

Anyone who has kids or may have kids, or knows anyone with kids should read this book. It was published in and I hope either the original author or one of her peers updates it and republishes. I really liked a lot of what Linn had to say on the subject of advertising to children, but boy did she seem to say a lot. Finally, her points could've been covered in half of the book size. What, if anything, can be done? Hooking them on unnecessary consumerism is sickening and convincing young girls that they need to diet and be sexy and young boy Anyone who has kids or may have kids, or knows anyone with kids should read this book. As professor Henry A.

Nobody needs a television Luvvie Ajayi Jones—author, cultural critic, digital entrepreneur—might be best described as a professional truthteller. Sort order.

I felt hsotile in a kind of negative way. The most entertaining and snappy chapter of the book is the first one, where Linn describes her experiences infiltrating a conference for marketers specializing in children. I don't like that my children will be subject to so much advertising and market research in the public schools. Fourth, technology is no friend to families or children.

Be the first one to write a review. This creates a spiritual void that American culture is attempting to fill with materialism. And, Linn's constant expressions of surprise xonsuming the lengths to which marketing firms will go to target children seem rather silly. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Feb 24, shannon rated it liked it Shelves: Marketing to kids is at the root of pretty much all that is wrong with childhood: obesity, precocious sexuality, violence, disrespect for parents and authority, constantly staring at TV and computer screens rather than engaging in healthy and creative play. Hooking them on unnecessary consumerism is sickening and convincing young girls that they need to diet and be sexy and young boy Anyone who has kids or may have kids, or knows anyone with kids should read this book.

Get A Copy. Explaining various things in terms of how consuimng child would view it. Linn would much rather the government make the choice for me and save me the trouble. Consuming Kids is a magnificent piece of work; I would only fault it for being slightly dated with regards to references to advertising through the Internet and social media; most of Linn's concern is advertising through television and the schools.

The first aim of the book, to show how marketers try to appeal to takoever by undermining their parents, is an eyebrow-raiser. Above all, keep violent media programs and games away from young eyes. I would have liked more recommendations on how to speak to children about advertising and steer them away from consumerism.

  • Details if other :. Lack of regulation leads to a myriad of choices, both good and bad.

  • She asked the audience "what's the puppet's name?

  • And if you think it's all up to parents to protect their kids from the onslaught of corporate marketing, this film will convince you otherwise. A must read for parents and caregivers.

  • Special Projects Highline. Marketers think that an eight-year-old is almost a twelve-year-old who is almost an eighteen-year-old, but developmentally, that just isn't true.

Social Issues. Corporations spend billions of dollars to influence our children and undermine our authority as parents, because it works. The problem is that I fear unleashing the marketing juggernaut that Disney has linked to all these classics. With the intensity of the California gold rush, corporations are racing to stake their claim on the consumer group formerly known as children. First and foremost, America has lost its moral compass.

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I've had conversations with multiple acquaintances about marketing twkeover children, and a lot of the people I've talked to seem to begin and hostile takeover their side of the argument with, "If you don't like advertisers marketing to kds kids, then turn off the TV. Even parents who strenuously attempt to limit their children's exposure to advertising find themselves undermined when their children return from a "field trip" to the Sports Authority with a bag full of promos and coupons. At the end of the book she does offer some good suggestions for how various members of our society can take action. Her approach to problem resolution is equal to removing choices for individuals, which is ultimately no solution at all. Linn would much rather the government make the choice for me and save me the trouble. It's hard to be a true libertarian once you become a parent; no matter how much you believe in parental responsibility or personal respo Susan Linn's thesis in "Consuming Kids" seems to be: "If only we could bring those evil corporations and those evil Republicans to heel, your daughters wouldn't be dressing like skanks, racking up credit card debt, and eating nothing but frosted Pop Tarts for breakfast.

A must read obseity parents and caregivers. They want- to use industry terms- to "own" children; "cradle to grave" brand loyalty; and "share of mind. As you will hear in the hours that follow, we are seeing an unprecedented level of anger, frustration, and activism among parents, health care professionals, educators, advocacy groups and plain old concerned citizens. In the new millennium, marketing executives are insinuating their brands into the fabric of children's lives. Some may be familiar to you.

Update I spoke too soon. Everytime I see a commercial geared toward kids it really catches my eye. Other Editions 1.

Another are the toys for little kids that are obviously geared to parents, one of the keywords that sticks out for me is "learning. I read a lot of parenting books but if I hcildhood choose just one book for every parent in America to read, it would be this one. Follow Us. Susan Linn make a solid case for a ban on marketing to young children and she does a great job of explaining why putting all the blame on parents is disingenuous. In various countries, laws curb television advertising aimed at children. Software Images icon An illustration of two photographs.

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While Consuming Kids deals with an inherantly interesting, even sensational topic, the consuming kids the hostile takeover of childhood obesity is actually pretty tame and almost academic. Read this to ikds about the psycholo If I sound like an old-timey gospel hour preacher on this topic, it's because I am: It makes me CRAZY to think of how many times a day that some marketing effort, in some form, crosses our path and worse, that of our children. Since when do toys that are flashing and talking learning toys? Comparing the marketing of today with the marketing of yesteryear is like comparing a BB gun to a smart bomb. Furthermore, she apparently recognizes barely that these issues lack bright lines that make legislation possible. Still, if you read through them, all those statistics and expositions are convicing and thought provoking.

So far it's interesting. It's hard to be a true libertarian once you become a parent; no matter how much and breast cancer believe in parental responsibility or personal respo Susan Linn's thesis in "Consuming Kids" seems to be: "If only we could bring those evil corporations and those evil Republicans to heel, your daughters wouldn't be dressing like skanks, racking up credit card debt, and eating nothing but frosted Pop Tarts for breakfast. Fatty foods, alcohol, and skank-tastic clothes for pre-teens? Baby-snatching hyenas I can deal with; nobody's spending billions of dollars a year to convince Sam that she needs to be dragged off by carrion eaters. Kids can recognize logos by eighteen months, and before reaching their second birthday, they're asking for products by brand name

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